Brushtail

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87,632 notes

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”
Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.
When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

daydreamsofarasta:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

👊👊👊

(Source: tsunamiwavesurfing, via keilasaur)

16,890 notes

In a study of injuries in 90 patients injured by rubber bullets, one died, 17 suffered permanent disabilities or deformities and 41 required hospital treatment after being fired upon with rubber bullets.

So when the cops claim this is a humane, legitimate crowd control tactic, they’re straight up lying to your face. Don’t let them bullshit you. (x)

Can we just start calling them what they are? Rubber coated bullets. Normal ass, violent, lethal projectiles.

(via x09)

(Source: ahsadler, via musical-thoughts)

148,188 notes

i-freakin-love-disney:

killerdraco:

memewhore:

disneyworldwonders:

Can I just say that I think this is the way Mulan should appear int the parks. In the beginning of the movie they make it very clear that the dress she wears to meet the matchmaker is not comfortable nor does it represent her personality. She spends the whole of the film proving that she is not a prize to be won or just a pawn to be married off at earliest convenience. She proves her worth in this outfit. She saves China in this outfit. She falls in love in this outfit. She risks her life, makes her strongest friendships, and changes the entire country IN THIS OUTFIT. Then they have her walk around the park in the same outfit she wore in the first scene of the movie and I think it is really negative toward her character. That is not who she is.



I’ve seen this post pop up on my dash time and time again, and it’s never quite sat right with me. I agree 120% with the idea that the pink “matchmaker dress” is a poor way to represent Mulan in the theme parks, but… so is her soldier armor. It’s just as much not who she is as the pink dress. It represents her pretending to be Ping, and her deceiving everyone around her. It is her pretending to be a man, to be someone else entirely. Honestly, if you want to talk about the outfit that best represents her, I’d suggest this one:

The outfit she wore when she defeated Shan Yu. That is who Mulan is; a warrior, but still a woman. It displays all of the strength that she truly has, yet still manages to be true to who she truly is. This it the outfit that she changed the entire country in; would anything have changed if she was still pretending to be a man? I doubt it. This proves that a woman can be strong, but still be feminine. Given that many people tend to equate being feminine with weakness, I think portraying that the two are not mutually exclusive is a damn powerful message to be portraying to kids in theme parks.
Just my two cents.

THANK YOU

i-freakin-love-disney:

killerdraco:

memewhore:

disneyworldwonders:

Can I just say that I think this is the way Mulan should appear int the parks. In the beginning of the movie they make it very clear that the dress she wears to meet the matchmaker is not comfortable nor does it represent her personality. She spends the whole of the film proving that she is not a prize to be won or just a pawn to be married off at earliest convenience. She proves her worth in this outfit. She saves China in this outfit. She falls in love in this outfit. She risks her life, makes her strongest friendships, and changes the entire country IN THIS OUTFIT. Then they have her walk around the park in the same outfit she wore in the first scene of the movie and I think it is really negative toward her character. That is not who she is.

image

I’ve seen this post pop up on my dash time and time again, and it’s never quite sat right with me. I agree 120% with the idea that the pink “matchmaker dress” is a poor way to represent Mulan in the theme parks, but… so is her soldier armor. It’s just as much not who she is as the pink dress. It represents her pretending to be Ping, and her deceiving everyone around her. It is her pretending to be a man, to be someone else entirely. Honestly, if you want to talk about the outfit that best represents her, I’d suggest this one:

image

The outfit she wore when she defeated Shan Yu. That is who Mulan is; a warrior, but still a woman. It displays all of the strength that she truly has, yet still manages to be true to who she truly is. This it the outfit that she changed the entire country in; would anything have changed if she was still pretending to be a man? I doubt it. This proves that a woman can be strong, but still be feminine. Given that many people tend to equate being feminine with weakness, I think portraying that the two are not mutually exclusive is a damn powerful message to be portraying to kids in theme parks.

Just my two cents.

THANK YOU

(Source: Flickr / klingon65, via musical-thoughts)

85,737 notes

bonnsexuality:

sam-cortland:

Never apologize for your fluency in english.
If you have a different mother tongue, you are under no obligation to know english at all, let alone fluent english.
Never let anyone make you feel bad for not speaking proper english.
Be proud of your mother tongue.
Why should we learn their language when they mock and refuse to learn our own.

 (via)

(via musical-thoughts)